Leopard Gecko

Leopard Gecko

Leopard Gecko

DIET: Insectivore

STATUS IN THE WILD: Least Concern

RANGE: Europe and Asia

PHYSICAL FEATURES AND CHARACTERISTICS

In the wild, leopard geckos are usually yellow with a multitude of black spots all over their body. Unlike many other geckos, leopard geckos do not have sticky toe pads for climbing surfaces but instead have claws. They can reach lengths of seven to ten inches long and live up to twenty years. While most other geckos lack eyelids, leopard geckos possess eyelids and can move, blink, and close their eyes when sleeping. A leopard gecko’s ears, due to a structure in their auditory system, allow light to shine right through its head when viewed from one side.

LIFESTYLE AND REPRODUCTION

Leopard geckos are nocturnal, hiding under rocks and in crevices during the day, and coming out at night in search of food. They store extra fat in their tails, saving it for times when finding food may prove difficult. Should a predator attack, the leopard gecko, like many other lizards, can drop its tail to distract and confuse a predator so it can make an escape.

Female leopard geckos can breed any time of year but prefer damp, humid environments to lay her eggs. While females may only lay two eggs per clutch, she can produce up to six clutches of eggs each year. The eggs, once laid, take forty-five to fifty-three days to incubate before hatching. The babies reach sexual maturity around eighteen months of age.

RANGE

These geckos can be found in southern Asia, southeast Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Pakistan, and India.

HABITAT

They tend to inhabit rocky desert and arid grassland areas.

DIET

They mostly feed on invertebrates and insects but will also eat other lizards.

CALIFORNIA KINGSNAKETOKAY GECKO